Take time for women’s health

This week is National Women's Health Week, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' observance of the importance of women doing the things they need to do to stay healthy. The theme this year is "It's Your Time."

Today was National Women's Checkup Day, on which women are urged to make appointments with their health-care providers and to find out what screenings and immunizations they need.

The general message from Uncle Sam to the women of America is the usual good stuff: Eat a nutritious diet, get plenty of sleep and exercise, wear your seatbelt, don't smoke.

This is a great idea, setting one week aside for women, who often are too busy taking care of others to take care of themselves, to concentrate on doing what they need to do to maintain their own health.

What are you doing for yourself this week? I would love to hear from you.

If Mama ain’t healthy…

We're halfway through National Women's Health Week, a time for women to remember that a mother's health is the linchpin for the whole family's health.

On Monday, National Women's Check-Up Day, we were all supposed to make all our necessary medical and dental appointments. If you missed it, you might consider making one or two of those appointments today.Art deco woman

If you're not sure what sort of maintenance you need to do, check out the Interactive Screening Chart and Immunization Tool on the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services website. It breaks down recommended exams, screenings and immunizations by age groups and classifications of health (mental health, reproductive health, oral health, to name a few).

The website notes that it's a good idea to talk with your health-care professional about the recommendations.

The basics of women's health are these, according to the HHR website:

*Get at least 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate physical activity, 1 hour and 15 minutes of vigorous physical activity, or a combination of both each week.

*Eat a nutritious diet.

*Visit a health care professional to receive regular checkups and preventive screenings.

*Avoid risky behaviors, such as smoking and not wearing a seatbelt.

*Pay attention to mental health, including getting enough sleep and managing stress.

"The Favorite" by Leon-Francois Comerre, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons