Specialists in women and babies

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists was founded in Chicago in 1951, the latest in a line of associations that has sought to serve the organizational needs of specialists in medicine for women.

By the time the organization was founded, the controversy over whether the two specialties should be practiced separately or together had been largely resolved, which reflected an improvement of the status of obstetrics. (One 19th century proponent of keeping the two disciplines together had characterized obstetrics as "the portal to the temple of gynecology.")

Obstetricians are not the only doctors who deliver babies — family physicians attend about 20 percent of births nationally, and midwives, mostly nurse-midwives, handled about 8 percent of births in 2004. Still, obstetricians deliver the majority of American babies.

ACOG membership is voluntary. The group, now headquartered in Washington, D.C., has 52,000 members, more than 90 percent of board-certified OB-GYNs. Important ACOG activities include the annual meeting, continuing education and the publication of the monthly journal Obstetrics and Gynecology, the so-called Green Journal.

Some of  ACOG's members are specialists in maternal-fetal medicine, gynecologic oncology, reproductive endocrinology, and other areas.