How hospitals can promote breast-feeding

The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative, an international program, has created a list of things birth facilities in the United States can do to optimize the chances that mothers will choose to breast-feed their babies.

Here are "The Ten Steps To Successful Breast-feeding," from BFHI USA:

    1. Have a written breast-feeding policy that is routinely communicated to all health-care staff.
    2. Train all health-care staff in skills necessary to implement this policy.
    3. Inform all pregnant women about the benefits and management of breast-feeding.
    4. Help mothers initiate breast-feeding within one hour of birth.
    5. Show mothers how to breast-feed and how to maintain lactation, even if they are separated from their infants.
    6. Give newborn infants no food or drink other than breast milk, unless medically indicated.
    7. Practice “rooming in” — allow mothers and infants to remain together 24 hours a day.
    8. Encourage breast-feeding on demand.
    9. Give no pacifiers or artificial nipples to breast-feeding infants.
    10. Foster the establishment of breast-feeding support groups and refer mothers to them on discharge from the hospital or clinic.

The BFHI is underwritten by the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF).

Clearing the first hurdle in breast-feeding

Fewer than 4 percent of births in the United States occur at facilities that are considered "baby friendly," according to the latest Breast-feeding Report Card, issued this week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Happy baby

That's interesting, in light of the fact that birth is the one point at which the nation's breast-feeding practices actually meet the goals set by Healthy People 2010.

And, it raises some questions: Are American women determined to breast-feed even in the teeth of an unsupportive environment? Or does strong support from the hospital not matter much in their decision? Do problems caused by settings where breast-feeding is not actively promoted only show up later?

Or are environments that come after the birth facility, including families, other medical advisers, child-care centers and workplaces, even less sympathetic to breast-feeding?

Only two hospitals in Illinois, my home state, are among the 99 "baby friendly" facilities recognized by the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative as providing "an optimal level of care for infant feeding." These are Pekin Hospital in Pekin and St. John's Hospital in Springfield.

Thirty of the hospitals on the list are in California.

"Although the hospital is not and should not be the only place a mother receives support for breastfeeding, hospitals provide a unique and critical link between the breastfeeding support provided prior to and after delivery," the BFHI's website states.

The BFHI is a joint global effort of the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF).

Swine flu more deadly to pregnant women

Pregnant women were more likely to die in last year’s outbreak of the so-called swine flu than other people were, the Journal of the American Medical Association reports in the issue published today.

Pregnant women represent only about 1 percent of the population of the United States, yet they accounted for 5 percent of deaths from the H1N1 flu between April and August of 2009, according to an analysis of data from the Centers of Disease Control in Atlanta, Georgia, by Alicia M. Siston, Ph.D., of the CDC, and colleagues.

Taking antiviral drugs soon after they became ill greatly helped pregnant women who were hospitalized.

Of 788 pregnant women who were reported to the CDC to have become ill with H1N1 virus between April and August, 30 died. That was 5 percent of all swine flu deaths for the period. Of 509 women who were hospitalized, 115 were so sick they were admitted to intensive care units.

If they had waited four days after the onset of symptoms to go to a doctor, pregnant women were six times more likely to wind up in an ICU than if they sought treatment after only two days.

Pregnant women should be vaccinated against H1N1, and should be treated quickly with antiviral drugs if they do become sick, the authors recommended.

Two-thirds of the women who died in the final tally for the year were in their final trimester of pregnancy. “Changes in the immune, cardiac, and respiratory systems are likely reasons that pregnant women are at increased risk for severe illness with influenza,” the authors wrote.

A cascade of errors

At the ACOG meeting last May, Dr. Robert Wachter talked about a case in a teaching hospital in which two women with similar names -- Jane Morrison and Joan Morris are the pseudonyms assigned to them -- were confused with one another, resulting in one of them receiving an invasive procedure intended for the other one. This case did not involve a birth story, but every medical specialty can take lessons away from it.

This case, which Dr. Wachter and colleagues published as "The Wrong Patient," in June, 2002, in the Annals of Internal Medicine, demonstrates how easily a series of oversights can cascade into a shocking medical error. (It could have been worse. The procedure was a cardiac electrophysiology study, not, say, a leg amputation.)

In fact, the team that analyzed the mishap identified 17 junctures at which the process could have been stopped but instead moved forward. No single mistake would have been enough to keep this juggernaut moving. Human error fed into institutional weaknesses, including "frighteningly poor communication," a lack of standardized protocols and a culture that had become sufficiently dysfunctional that more than one person thought, incredibly, Gee, this doesn't seem right, but I'm going to do it anyway.

"Human performance can beimproved but not perfected," the team concluded. Protocols must be in place to head off the inevitable errors before they converge into tragedy.

The first woman doctor, U.S. division

As the first woman doctor in the United States, Elizabeth Blackwell had the dubious honor of showing the way for women to qualify for and enter a profession in which, at the time, they were pointedly unwelcome.

Blackwell endured repeated rejections on her way into medical school, where she was shunned by the male students and shut out of clinical opportunities by the teachers. After she finished medical school, when no one would hire her, she founded her own hospital and made her own opportunities.

Elizabeth Blackwell

Elizabeth Blackwell

Blackwell was born in England; her father was a wealthy Quaker and sugar refiner whose business eventually fell on hard times. The large family moved to the United States when Elizabeth was 11 and settled in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Blackwell''s father died when she was a teenager and the family opened a small private school, where Elizabeth began teaching.

When she decided she wanted to be a doctor, she was turned away from 29 medical schools before being accepted by the Geneva Medical School in Geneva, N.Y. In spite of the hostility she encountered there, she graduated at the top of her class in 1849, with plans to become a surgeon.

Blackwell traveled to Paris to take a course in midwifery, where she contracted an infection that cost her the sight in one eye. That put an end to her hopes of becoming a surgeon. Back in the United States, Blackwell found she couldn't get work in a hospital, so she went into private practice.

In 1853, along with her sister Emily, and Marie Zakrzewska, two other early female doctors, Blackwell founded the New York Infirmary for Women and Children, now New York Downtown Hospital. During the Civil War, Blackwell trained nurses to treat soldiers injured on the battlefield.

The Blackwell sisters also founded the Women's Medical College of New York in 1869, but within a few years, Elizabeth went back to England. She was a professor of gynecology at the London School of Medicine for Women for the rest of her working life. Blackwell died at the age of 89, in 1910.