Some doctors refuse to care for obese women

Fourteen of 105 obstetrics-gynecology practices surveyed by the South Florida Sun-Sentinel last month said they will not take on obese women as patients.

Representatives of six of the practices cited higher rates of complications in women who are obese, but other respondents said heavier women tax their exam tables and other equipment.

"People don't realize the risk we're taking by taking care of these patients," the paper quoted Dr. Albert Triana as saying. Dr. Triana is one of two physicians in a South Miami practice that turns away obese patients, according to the article. "There's more risk of something going wrong and more risk of getting sued."

Seventy-two million Americans — about one in three — meet the criteria for obesity, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Ga.

"If I had that policy, I wouldn't have a practice. I'd lose half my patients," Dr. Maureen Whelihan, a West Palm Beach ob-gyn, told the Sun-Sentinel's Bob LaMendiola. "We never turn down anyone."

In a followup article in American Medical News, reporter Christine S. Moyer asked doctors to comment on the practice of turning patients away because of their weight.

"This is [primary care physicians'] patient population, and [they're] here to serve the patients," said one of them, Dr. David Bryman, a Phoenix family physician specializing in bariatric medicine, which deals with the causes, treatment and prevention of obesity. Dr. Bryman is president-elect of the American Society of Bariatric Physicians. "If that requires getting a little extra equipment to accommodate them, it's just part of the practice of medicine."

Mixed report on breast-feeding

Three-fourths of American babies start life on the breast, but moms are giving up on breast-feeding sooner than officials would like to see.

Healthy People 2010, a national statement of health goals, sets the bar for breast-feeding at birth at 74 percent. Fully 75 percent of American moms are breast-feeding at birth, so the country is (barely) meeting that objective.

However, the goals would have half of mothers breast-feeding at six months of life and a quarter continuing on at a year. In practice, 43 percent are breast-feeding at six months and 22 percent at one year.

"We need to direct even more effort toward making sure mothers have the support they need in hospitals, workplaces and communities to continue breastfeeding beyond the first few days of life, so they can make it to those six- and 12-month marks," said William Dietz, M.D., Ph.D., director of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Ga.

The CDC issues an annual report card of how "key community settings" like hospitals and child-care centers are supporting breast-feeding, which research has demonstrated can improve an individual's lifetime health outlook.

While the overall news is good for moms' getting a start on breast-feeding at birth, the swing among the various states ranges from 90 percent in Utah to to 53 percent in Mississipi.

C-sections at all-time high in new CDC report

The rate of births that ended in Caesarean-sections climbed by 53% in the years between 1996 to 2007, when they stood at 32%, the highest rate ever reported in the United States, the National Center for Health Statistics reported on Tuesday.

The rate is higher than those most other industrialized countries are experiencing, according to the report from the NCHS , which is an arm of the Centers for Disease Control, based in Atlanta, Ga. The cost of a C-section is almost double that of a vaginal delivery, the report notes.

C-sections were up for all groups across the board in the 11 years that were the major focus of the study, in terms of age, race, location, and how far along women were in their pregnancies.

About 1.4 million women gave birth by Ceasarean in 2007. In 2006, Caesarean delivery was the surgical procedure most often performed in American hospitals.

Here are the major findings of the report:

The U.S. C-section rate, 21 percent in 1996, was 32 percent in 2007, an increase of 53 percent. The steepest rise occurred between 2000 and 2007.

C-section rates went up by 50 percent or more in 34 states. In six states -- Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Nevada, Rhode Island, and Washington -- the rate increased by more than 70 percent.

The rate rose for women of all age groups, with women under 25 having greatest rate of increase, 57 percent.

All racial and ethnic groups experienced increases. Black women had the highest C-section rate in 2007, 34 percent. Native American women had the lowest rate, 28 percent.

Caesarean rates increased for deliveries of infants of all gestational ages. C-sections for pre-term babies (less than 34 weeks gestational age) increased 36 percent; the rates for late pre-term babies (34 to 36 weeks) and term and post-term babies (37+ weeks) went up nearly 50 percent.

Early and late pre-term babies were more likely to be delivered by Caesarean section than were babies born at 37+ weeks.

The report cited possible reasons for the increases in Caesarean sections, in addition to medical indications for the surgery, as "maternal demographic characteristics," like advanced maternal age, fears of malpractice suits among physicians, doctors' preferences, and maternal preferences.