A perfect baby every time

Every pregnancy begins with a 3 percent chance that the resulting baby will have birth defects, and that is before individual genetic and environmental histories come into play. Some birth defects cannot be prevented or fixed. Medicine cannot work miracles.

That's the message in "The perils of the imperfect expectation of the perfect baby," an article in this month's American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Prospective parents need to understand that "perfection in pregnancy is not attainable now or even in the foreseeable future," according to the article's authors.

Doctors too can get drawn into "expecting more from medicine than its limited diagnostic and therapeutic capacities justify," say the article's authors, led by Frank A. Chervenak MD. Not only that, but "many pregnant patients are optimistic about the advances in medicine and are confident that their physicians will solve all problems that could occur with their pregnancy."

In fact, everyone needs to get in touch with "the inherent errors of human reproduction, the highly variable clinical outcomes of these errors, the limited capacity of medicine to detect these errors, and the even more limited capacity to correct them," the article states.

The expectation that a perfect baby can eventually be taken away from every pregnancy "assumes powers of medicine to control human reproduction that medicine does not possess," the article states.

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